Web and Software

A visit to the Nashville Entrepreneur Center or any coworking space will provide you with instant examples of the growing, sizzling, tech scene. Coding is truly another language (with various “dialects,” if you will) and more and more people are speaking that language every day. Web and software platform designers and developers usually prefer to build their products without having to think about legal issues. Do privacy issues, EULAs, and trademark protection make you cringe? Enter Spear IP

Here are some basic legal items for web and software companies to consider.

Master Serivce Agreement MSA Software Development Maria Spear Ollis Spear IP Nashville Tennessee Tech AttorneyFor developers, get service agreements (often referred to as MSAs) in writing (making things like deadlines, ownership of content, service levels, and change orders clear for your client).
Trademark Search Maria Spear Ollis Spear IP Nashville Tennessee Tech AttorneyMake sure your platform or business name is available (and, if so, consider registering it with the Trademark Office).
Shared Economy Terms Maria Spear Ollis Spear IP Nashville Tennessee Tech AttorneyFor online and shared economy platforms, make sure the proper terms of use or user agreements are available and conspicuously posted (and that users must agree to those terms).
Business Entity Formation Maria Spear Ollis Spear IP Nashville Tennessee Tech AttorneyConsider forming a business entity, and follow all necessary formalities, to protect and isolate your personal assets from your business activities.
Copyright Registration Maria Spear Ollis Spear IP Nashville Tennessee Tech AttorneyRegister code and other proprietary website content with the Copyright Office (to put yourself on better footing if you're ever the victim of copyright infringement).

Need help some of these legal tasks? Schedule a consultation with Spear IP here.

For developers, get service agreements (often referred to as MSAs) in writing(making things like deadlines, ownership of content, service levels, and change orders clear for your client). Make sure your platform or business name is available (and, if so, consider registering it with the Trademark Office). For online and shared economy platforms, make sure the proper terms of use or user agreements are available and conspicuously posted (and that users must agree to those terms). Consider forming a business entity, and follow all necessary formalities, to protect and isolate your personal assets from your business activities. Register code and other proprietary website content with the Copyright Office (to put yourself on better footingif you’re ever the victim of copyright infringement).