bloglovinBloglovin iconCombined ShapeCreated with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. rssRSS iconsoundcloudSoundCloud iconFill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. close searchCreated with Lunacy

3 Lies Everyone Believes About Avoiding Copyright Infringement

Woman researching avoiding copyright infringement

Today I’m talking about the three big lies that you might have heard about avoiding copyright infringement.

You might think you’re not committing copyright infringement, but… you could be wrong. (Did you get that reference?)

In this video, you’re going to learn what every online brand needs to know about avoiding copyright infringement on the internet.

Lie number one: if I’m not charging anything, or making money from it, then it’s not copyright infringement. Right?

Wrong.

Copyright infringement is what’s called “strict liability.” That’s lawyer speak for: just doing the act is enough.

There doesn’t have to be any kind of intent to commit copyright infringement. You don’t have to make money from it. Just the act of copying is copyright infringement. There’s no requirement that you make money in order for it to be considered copyright infringement.

(Sorry.)

Number two: if I add a disclaimer, or tag the original creator, then I can’t get in trouble.

Wrong. So wrong.

(Apparently, I’m into quoting Mean Girls today.)

You’ve seen “I claim no rights to this music,” or “I claim no rights to whatever” in people’s posts, right? But, like I just said, you’ve copied it. That’s it. That’s the infringement. Just copying or using someone else’s material without permission is infringement.

And!

I’ve heard of several photographers who actually track infringement on social media, by the people that tagged them.

Using someone else’s photo without their permission, unless you properly licensed it somehow, is copyright infringement. Credit, or no credit.

Numero 3: If I found a photo on Google image search or on Pinterest, then it’s royalty-free or public domain, and I can use it, and it’s not copyright infringement.

No, no, no, no, no.

I had a client once that used a photo that he found on Google image search in a blog post. He got a big fat cease and desist letter from a firm that does volume copyright infringement work. That just means that they sent thousands of cease and desist letters — that is their bread and butter.

The photographers that they represent all register their photos with the Copyright Office. (Which is very, very smart.)

Then, they pay these firms to crack down on unauthorized uses. So this cease and desist letter asked for multiple thousands. Based on the Copyright Act, if someone infringes your work, and you’ve registered with the Copyright Office, you get from $750 to $30,000 in damages. He didn’t end up having to pay 30,000, but he had to pay something.

Hear me on this.

Google Image Search catalogs images from everywhere. They are not necessarily royalty-free. They are not necessarily public domain. Don’t look on Google image search for free images. Nope, nope, nope.

So the secret to avoiding copyright infringement online?

Use things that only you’ve created, or if you’re using something that you didn’t create, or posting something that you didn’t create, make sure you have permission.

That’s it.

So I hope that helps you to better understand the three lies everyone believes about avoiding copyright infringement on the internet. And I’ll see you next time.

CONTACT COPYCATS YOURSELF WITH CONFIDENCE

A Content Creator’s Guide to Dealing with Copycats

Itching to contact that copycat, but not ready to go full lawyer-cease-and-desist, yet?

In this free resource, you’ll get:

  • A little checklist to run through before you contact someone yourself;
  • An idea of things that you can say; and
  • What NOT to say.

Click here for access.

Protecting a Content-Based Business, Part I: 3 Prerequisites for Copyright Protection

protecting a content based business part 1 prerequisites for copyright protection

You really should know the prerequisites for copyright protection in the US.

But first, let’s talk about protecting content. A lot of content, like online videos, long form blog posts, micro-blogging, podcast episodes, or some combination of those things. This is a three part series that’s going to break down:

  • The three things you need in order to qualify for copyright protection, (which you’ll find here, in part one)
  • How to make sure you own your creative content (part two); and
  • A list of content that’s eligible for copyright protection, some of which you might not have thought of yourself (part three).

But this is part one, the three prerequisites for copyright protection.

Prerequisite for Copyright Protection, #1: If you want to protect content, it’s gotta be creative.

This doesn’t just mean that it needs to be a work of art, a musical composition, a video, or something that you traditionally think of as creative. It means that your content can’t just be a fact, a mere list of ingredients, a mere idea. It has to be creative. The content should be something that’s the product of “the sweat of your brow.” You’ve worked to create this thing somehow.

You might look at some creative works and think the bar to creativity might be pretty low. You’re right. There’s not a huge bar to creativity. But it does have to be creative.

A theory, a process, an idea: these things are not creative enough to satisfy this prerequisite for copyright protection in the US. But if you have a group of facts that you’ve creatively arranged, that creative arrangement is protectable.

If you’re protecting content via copyright, it has to be tangible.

Now that we’ve gotten the creativity part out of the way, thing two is that it has to be tangible. Not tangible in that you have to actually be able to grab it and touch it. Tangible in that it lives outside of your head. It is either on paper, it is recorded, it is somehow accessible by someone else.

You’ve gotta own it.

The third thing is that it is actually original to you. Now, it can be something that you’ve collaborated with someone else on. Maybe you paid a contractor to contribute creative work. (And, hopefully, they signed a contract.) Or, you have collaborated with someone else and you both own it. Either way, it has to be an original creative work. I will talk a little bit more about originality in part two, but it should be original — as in original to you or owned by you.

So those are the three things: creative, tangible, original. Hope this helps you understand the three prerequisites for copyright protection, and I will see you in the next part of this series.