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Canva: Terms of Use You Didn’t Read

Let’s talk about Canva! Terms of Use You Didn’t Read is back and we’re going to talk through just a couple of interesting terms that I found when looking through Canva’s terms of use. Remember, these are things that you’ve agreed to by using Canva.

I found some real treasure when reading these terms! There’s a term in Canva’s Free Media License Agreement that applies to how you can use some of the stock photos and imagery within Canva.


Plain-English gold star

First of all, like Pinterest, Canva gives a plain-English explanation of provisions in its terms of use so, gold star to Canva.

The many faces (or pages) to Canva’s Terms of Use

There’s more to its policies than just Canva’s Terms of Use. The policies are made up of several different pages or sub-policies, including a Contributor Agreement and a Free Media License Agreement. The Contributor Agreement applies to any designers that submit their work to be a part of Canva’s offering, whether it’s a template or photograph. And then there’s the Free Media License Agreement.

This is super important. So, if you use any of that free media, like stock photos or graphic art, here’s what Canva has to say about using that free stuff.

a selection from canva's terms of use

Yowza.

So, again. If you’re using anything with an identifiable person, with a logo, that reflects a certain place, Canva, here, is saying that they can’t guarantee they have the appropriate rights for you to use those things in a commercial or business setting. So that is important if you are using Canva in connection with your business.

By publishing on the platform, you’re giving permission to display

Next, simple, if you publish your designs in Canva, then you allow Canva to publish those for others to view.

Canva’s Terms of Use sheds light on what happens to media you’ve used if you cancel your paid account

I was curious about this, since I recently started dabbling in Canva myself. Obviously when you have a paid or “Pro” account, you have access to more things and you can do more within the platform. But what happens if you close your account or you cancel your membership to Canva? What happens to the designs that you created with media that were, say, “Pro” only, but you plan to still pin those pins or use those graphics on Instagram? Can you do that even though you don’t have your account any longer?

The answer is yes, of course, anything that you created under a valid, paid plan, you can still continue to use.

But, if there was some kind of invalid transaction, they couldn’t charge you during that period where that thing was created, you don’t have rights to use it.

Big Brother/Canva is watching

Finally, Canva has the right to monitor anything you import or export from its platform to make sure that you’re complying with its terms of use.


I hope this kind of opens your eyes on things that you’ve agreed to by using Canva, especially with regard to that Free Media License,.


Hey, online business owner! I’ve got a little something for you. Learn four things that you can do RIGHT now to protect your business online — one thing delivered to your inbox for four weeks — by clicking the image below.

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Pinterest: Terms of Use You Didn’t Read

woman reading through pinterest terms of use

This month’s “Terms of Use You Didn’t Read” focuses on Pinterest and the terms of use that you’ve agreed to by using Pinterest.


Pinterest Terms of Use: More Simply Put

First, the these Terms of Use use a really cool thing that I’ve actually considered doing in some of the contracts that I write. They have a “more simply put” section under each section in their Terms of Use. This is basically two or three sentences that explain the paragraph in easy to use language. You’ll have to check it out yourself I think it’s very helpful for people when they are actually reading the Terms of Use.

Pinterest’s Business Requirements

Next in Pinterest Terms of Use you will see that if you are using Pinterest in connection with a business, you must create a business account and agree to Pinterest’s Business Terms.

Who Owns the Content You Post to Pinterest?

Pinterest’s stance on copyright ownership of content is pretty clear. They say you own everything that you post to Pinterest, but you give Pinterest permission to share it on the website. By posting, you also give users permission to save it to their boards and save that content. But, it’s still yours — the content that you post is still yours.

What Happens if you Delete Content

Next, Pinterest wants to make sure you understand that if you delete content it might remain on users’ boards; in other words users might have saved that content. Even though you deleted it it might remain on users boards because they’ve saved a copy. The ol’ what happens on the internet stays on the Internet conundrum.

Limitation of liability.

Remember my discussion about limitation of liability in my post about the WordPress Terms of Use? Essentially, if you have a claim against Pinterest for breach of the Terms of Use, then the most you’re going to get out of them is a hundred bucks.

Pinterest Terms of Use Explains Third-Party Links

Finally Pinterest has the best ever explanation of third-party content that I’ve seen on a Terms of Use. Usually a website’s Terms of Use will talk about third-party content and third-party links; in other words links to sites that are controlled by someone that isn’t the owner of the platform. Usually those terms of use say “we don’t take any responsibility for the content found at those third-party links or the privacy practices of those third parties” (etc.)

The “more simply put” two-sentence explanation of that section is:

Pinterest Terms of Use explanation of third-party links

Pretty straightforward, huh?

I hope this gives you a little sneak peek on the Terms of Use that you’ve agreed to by using Pinterest.

Hey, online business owner! I’ve got a little something for you. Learn four things that you can do RIGHT now to protect your business online — one thing delivered to your inbox for four weeks — by clicking the image below.

WordPress: Terms of Use You Didn’t Read

group of people reading wordpress terms of use for the first time

Y’all know I’m a big Terms of Use geek. I’m super excited about this new monthly series, “Terms of Use You Didn’t Read.” I will go in and pick out a handful of terms in platforms that you might be using and point out some of the things that you’ve agreed to by using the platform.

The series will show you, in general, how Terms of Use are used. It’ll also show things that you might not know you’ve agreed to by using certain platforms. Today I’m talking about WordPress.com, a common website platform for building tons of different kinds of websites.


WordPress Terms of Use: Share and Share-Alike

The coolest thing about WordPress’s Terms of Use is that they have released them under a Creative Commons Share-Alike license.

Well, what the heck does that mean?

That means that you can copy and paste those suckers and use them for your own website!
Obviously, they should be tailored to your website. WordPress even says this in the first couple of paragraphs of their Terms of Use. WordPress also says it would appreciate credit if you do post them. Still, pretty neat that they put out there that you can use these Terms of Use for your own website.

Pretty cool, WordPress. Pretty cool.

Permission to Re-Blog [automatically] Granted

Next is something in the WordPress Terms of Use that has to do with “re-blogging.” The Terms of Use say:

“You give other WordPress.com users permission to share your content on other WordPress.com websites and add their own content to it (so in other words, re-blog) so long as they only use a portion of your post and they give you credit as the original author by linking back to your website.

See: https://wordpress.com/tos/

In other words, by posting on a WordPress.com website, you grant permission to other WordPress users to copy and paste portions of your website “so long as they only use a portion of your post.”
It doesn’t say what “a portion”means, it doesn’t say big or small portion. This might be worth monitoring, to the extent you monitor your own content that’s being reposted or shared.

The Easter Egg in the WordPress Terms of Use

In the Disclaimer of Warranties section, WordPress has a little Easter egg hiding. So, they say, “If you’re actually reading this, here’s a treat.” And they hyperlink to a picture of barbecue. ‘Cause they love barbecue.

It’s just funny because they call out the fact that nobody actually reads these things. ( I mean, I do.) I bet at least ten percent of the people that read this post will be surprised by what they’ve agreed to by using WordPress.

WordPress Limitation of Liability

In their Limitation of Liability, WordPress points out that their liability is limited. The limitation is either the fees you’ve paid over the last 12 months, or $50 (whichever is greater). So, to use easy math, if you pay $10 per month for a year, then you are limited to $120 in damages. (That is, if there’s ever a cause of action that arises between you and WordPress.)


So that’s it in terms of some of the terms that you’ve agreed to by using WordPress. Just a handful there for your entertainment and education.

Hey, online business owner! I’ve got a little something for you. Learn four things that you can do RIGHT now to protect your business online — one thing delivered to your inbox for four weeks — by clicking the image below.

People Are “Total-ly” Suing Amazon for Counterfeit Eclipse Glasses

People are Suing Amazon for Counterfeit Eclipse Glasses

Those of you in the Nashville, Tennessee area remember the total eclipse that occurred last week. For two blissful minutes (or eerie minutes, depending on your perspective), the sun disappeared, the birds stopped chirping while the cicadas started, and there was a sunset on every horizon. After a flurry of “eye-popping” prices for eclipse glasses, some unscrupulous vendors began peddling counterfeit glasses — glasses that would not protect your eyeballs from the wonders of science. But is Amazon truly at fault?

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License to Wha? Using Stock Photos & Fonts

Using Stock Photos & FontsUsing Stock Photos and Fonts

We’ve become a very visual society. Maybe we have always been that way, but social media has made us more aware of just how visual our society is. (Hello, Instagram.) As such, every article, DIY project, and blog post has a pretty image. (If there is text overlaid on the image, it’s pretty text.) Luckily, there are several websites that offer stock photos and free fonts to help make things “pretty.” But can you really get away with using stock photos and free fonts with no strings attached?

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IP Planning For A New Business

IP Planning For A New Business

You’re starting a new biz. Congratulations! No doubt you’ve spent time figuring out your logo, the design of your website, etc. Have you thought about your intellectual property and doing some IP planning? It seems a little chicken-before-the-egg (do you register first or launch first?). And, yes, it’s a little less “sexy” than web design. But, IP planning for a new business could be one of those things where your future self will thank you if you actually sit down and do it.

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Peeple: Legal Lessons For App & Website Providers

Legal Lessons For App & Website Providers

Peeple, an app that has yet to take on its final form, has been causing quite a stir. The Canadian company behind the app (namely, its co-founder, Julia Cordray) has touted it as “Yelp for People.” But what are the legal concerns surrounding an app or website platform that can be used for negative purposes such as cyber-bullying and defamation?

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Why Your Notice to Facebook Doesn’t Work: A Lesson in Terms of Use

A Lesson in Terms of Use

Facebook, the world’s most popular (and populated) social network, has once again been buzzing with status updates where users declare their rights against Facebook and tell it what it can and can’t do with that user’s content. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but these status updates mean nothing. Why?

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