bloglovinBloglovin iconCombined ShapeCreated with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. rssRSS iconsoundcloudSoundCloud iconFill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. close searchCreated with Lunacy

Protecting a Content-Based Business, Part 2: How to Make Sure You Own Your Content

woman wondering how to make sure you own your content
Visual learner? Get the same info in video form, here.

This is part two in a three-part series on protecting your content based business. (This was part one.) I’m talking about how to make sure that you own your content.

Make Sure You Own Your Content by Actually Creating It Yourself

The first way to make sure that you own your content: create it yourself. It sounds a little bit obvious, but if you create the entire thing yourself, it is likely that you own it.

(Unless you’re an employee and you’re somehow creating it in the scope of your employment for someone else.)

Do you have to mail yourself a copy in order for you to somehow own it? Do you have to register it with the Copyright Office in order to somehow own it? Nope, and nope.

That’s it. Number one: make sure that you created it yourself, and you probably own it.

Now, did you use others somehow in the creation of this content? Examples might be a video editor, or a copywriter contributing to parts of your website. Really any other person that is contributing creative content to your overall work. If so, that person should sign a contract, making sure that you own the rights to that material. I call it an IP Rights Agreement, you might call it or have heard of it as a Work-for-Hire Agreement or IP Assignment Agreement. Either way, you need to make sure that that person signed over the rights in their contribution to you. Otherwise, the default rule is that they own it.

Quick recap.

It’s that simple. One, make sure that you created it. Two, make sure that anyone that contributed to your creative work signed a document confirming that you own the IP.

That’s it for part two! Join me in part three, where I’m talking about a long list of things that you can protect under US copyright law. (Some of which I bet you haven’t thought of.)

Second Anniversary: Blog Round-Up

spear ip legal checklist for modern business

This month marks the second (!) anniversary of Spear IP’s opening. You might notice that Spear IP started as a general intellectual property law practice. In its second year, Spear IP pivoted to focus on the fashion, hospitality, blog and new media, and tech industries, along with creative (non-musical) professionals. Here is a look back at the lessons learned and content shared on the Spear IP Blog during Year Two.

Continue reading “Second Anniversary: Blog Round-Up”

Protecting a Blog (Series): Copyright + Copy

protecting a blog with spear ip

When we think “the media,” a blog might not be the first thing that comes to mind, but think about it. A blog is content that is updated daily (if not more frequently), and a single blog post can be shared thousands of times. So when it comes to blog content, what’s protectable, and how do you protect it? This two-part series will look at just that. Below, you’ll learn about the protectable elements in a blog and some of the Copyright Office policies at play (hint: they work in favor of blog owners!).

Continue reading “Protecting a Blog (Series): Copyright + Copy”