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Annoying Legal Words to Stop Using in 2022

The next time you see these legal words in a contract, I want you to throw a tantrum and run away. Seriously, I would have words with these words! In today’s blog, I’m going to go through 3 annoying legal words that we need to remove from contracts in 2021, 2022…and forever.

Why is legal jargon so hard to understand?

If you’re frustrated with the fact that reading a legal document feels archaic and mind-numbing, you’re not alone. Especially in 2021, there are so many words and ways we can get our point across, without having to confuse our readers.

However, the legal language in contracts and agreements is often written in a way to avoid assumption and interpretation, which makes it specific and precise.  But that doesn’t mean there are some words that we probably need to all agree it’s time to move past!

Legal Word #1 – Shall

I shall do this. I shall go to the store today.

No, you will. Shall means will. Let’s use will instead!

Legal Word #2 – Here In

I can’t even use herein, in a sentence because it’s so ridiculous! When you see here in a contract it means “in this contract.” The rights are described herein.

How about using the phrase, “the rights described in this contract”? It sounds like plain English!

Legal Word #3 – Notwithstanding the foregoing

Notwithstanding the foregoing essentially means despite whatever was in the previous sentence, or despite whatever was in the previous paragraph. You could also say the exception to the previous sentence is instead of notwithstanding the foregoing.

I challenge you to use notwithstanding the foregoing in a sentence in your everyday life. I can’t do it! Instead, let’s use “the exception to the previous sentence.” It sounds so much better!

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